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Harwood Science Lab Common Rubric

Page history last edited by coylem@... 10 years, 7 months ago
 

Harwood Common Science Lab Rubric

 

 
Title
  • Is complete, scientific and describes the investigation
 
Purpose
  • Statement of problem or question
  • If it is a question is must be specific and testable
  • Describes the goal of the investigation
 
Hypothesis
/prediction (if applicable)
  • Refers to the investigative question or problem
  • Includes prediction (“if then”) and hypothesis (“because”).
  • Clear hypothesis which predicts the influence of the manipulated/independent variable on the responding/dependent variable and identifies standardized/constant/controlled variables.
  • The hypothesis should be testable
 
Experimental design
  • Basic concept of the experiment, if applicable
  • Materials
  • Procedures (reproducible, detailed)
  • Units of measurement of data
  • Identification of the value for independent variables
  • Description of any controls
  • Design considers statistical significance through number of trials, quantity tested, etc.
  • Diagrams of experimental set up, as applicable
 
Results
  • Includes observations
  • Data is organized, completes and includes appropriate and consistent units of measurements
  • Data is represented graphically and applying the “best fit” line or curve.
  • Uses appropriate graphical representation (accurate scale, increments on axis, etc)
  • Correct variables and units are labeled
  • Any data calculations are shown
 
Conclusions/
Discussion
  • Written in paragraph form as a reflection
  • Conclusion is evidence-based citing the data, refers back to purpose/question/problem and indicates acceptance or rejection of the hypothesis
  • Defines the outcome of the investigation
  • Possible sources of experimental error stated
  • Note any issues of experimental precision and accuracies, including any consistencies or inconsistencies with results.
  • Note any mathematical relationships between independent and dependent variables (or any significant interpolations or extrapolations)
  • Discussion includes new questions, ways to revise/improve the experiment or what could be explored further.
 
Other
  • Includes name and date
  • Report is neat and presentable
  • Sections are titled
  • Uses correct grammar, spelling and organization
  • Uses passive voice (no personal pronouns)
 

 

 

Harwood Common Rubric - The Science Lab Report

 

 

Novice

Apprentice

Practitioner

Scholar

Title – An

Overview of the Investigation  

  • Includes some descriptors but not necessarily focused on this investigation
  • Too general  and unfocused
  • Includes some specificity for the concept  under investigation
  • Descriptors relate well to science concept
  • May be a bit wordy or incomplete   
  • Is concise, complete, scientific and describes the concept of the investigation

 

Purpose explains the laboratory objective(s) may include a testable question and background information. 

  • The problem or question may not provide a single focus or show specificity to only one science concept
  • Question provided is too simple ( yes or no)
  • Describes a very general area for investigation but is not clear or specific to an individual investigation

 

  • The problem’s statement  or question provides a science concept
  • The question may not be completely testable or connect to the process as written
  • Describes a general goal for the investigation that is an important science concept  
  • The problem’s statement  or question relates clearly to one of important science concepts
  • If it is a question it must be specific, testable and connected to science and process
  • Describes the specific goal of the investigation relating back to pertinent science concepts

 

Hypothesis/prediction (if applicable)

An unconfirmed statement that relates the dependent (responding) and independent (manipulated) variables via observations and data and provides a logical reason for changes noted that is testable through controlled experimentation.

Provides enough information to predict expected outcomes.

  • Uses documented observations to write a statement but statement is really a prediction of outcome expected.
  • May not be clear
  • May not be testable
  • May not provide the relationship between dependent and independent variable
  • Scientific reason for change not clearly expressed
  • Has an unconfirmed and testable statement that provides the “If” and “then” and attempts to determine the scientific reasoning for the “because”. The statement may not be testable, complete or provide a clear understanding of the variables
  • Directly refers to the statement or investigative question or problem in purpose
  • Includes hypothesis (may use “if then” and “because”) and a prediction.
  • Hypothesis is complete, easily read and provides sufficient information to allow reader to identify the influence of the manipulated/ independent variable on the responding/dependent variable and identifies standardized/ constant/ controlled variables
  • The hypothesis provides enough information to be testable and allow for a critical prediction of results.

 

Experimental design -

Includes the set-up (diagram if applicable), a complete material list, a reproducible procedure for a specific    experiment

 

Provides units of measure, the independent variables, all controls,  a number of trials

  • Experiment provided is basic with no diagrams and/or little connection to purpose.
  • Incomplete or confusing set-up, materials and procedural steps are provided
  • The expected outcome may not be focused or useable to support the hypothesis or the purpose of the laboratory.
  • Procedure may not identify the dependent, independent, or specify how to control any other variables
  • Procedure requires only one trial which will not ensure results are valid or reproducible.
  • Experiment is basic and has connection to purpose.
  • May not include necessary diagrams to improve set-up reproducibility.
  • Steps follow a logical sequence and provide a good attempt, but it may have order issues and be too general to allow for replicating the experiment later
  • Procedure names the dependent and independent variables and gives suggestions about how to isolate the dependent variable.
  • Multiple trials (2-3) are in place but the number is not adequate to ensure valid results
  • Basic concept of the experiment, if applicable to the purpose and concept
  • Materials list is provided and is complete
  • Procedures (reproducible, detailed)
  • Units of measurement of data
  • Identification of the value for independent variables
  • Description of any controls
  • Design considers statistical significance through number of trials (4-5), quantity tested, etc.
  • Diagrams of experimental set up, as applicable

 

Results –

Observations and/or data are organized and presented clearly in data table, which includes chronology and labels

Different charts or graphs are formatted to show data in a clear and straight forward manner

Discussion is used to explain or describe sequential information to annotate the information given to help clarify what the data shows.

 

  • Observations are included but confusing or hard to read, do not appear sequential or organized in a logical
  • Data table may be incomplete: missing key units, noted inconsistent significance, or data may not be included in table
  • Calculation area is jumbled and confusing. Not all set-ups are provided or units and data may be missing
  • The discussion does not help to clarify the sequence or directly aid in understanding
  • Observations are descriptive but may not be complete or in the proper sequence. They do appear to be sequential and organized in a clear and logical manner.
  • Data table has an accepted format but may include data with questionable significance or have questionable labels
  • Discussion provided helps to clarify but may not go into enough information to aid reader’s overall understanding of the data
  • Includes observations written in clear succinct yet descriptive format
  • Data is accurate, organized, significant, completed and includes appropriate and consistent units of measurement
  • Data is represented graphically and applying the “best fit” line or curve.
  • Uses appropriate graphical representation (accurate scale, increments on axis, etc)
  • Correct variables and units are labeled
  • Any data calculations are shown

 

 Analysis/Conclusion Data is analyzed or interpreted to determine if original hypothesis or prediction was supported.

Mistakes made while conducting the investigation are documented and ways to improve experiment on reruns are put forth.

 

 

  • Data interpretation is cursory with no attention to the data or citations, trends and  relationship to the original objectives and hypothesis are missing
  • Some mention of issues encountered and ways to improve on the experiment are given but reflection is confusing and may not relate to the outcomes determined
  • Data is interpreted and specific information is cited to analysis but may not refer back to the purpose, question or problem
  • Interpretation of data does not clearly determine if hypothesis is supported
  • Source of error is cursory such as human error and does not show a valid attempt at resolving this type of error in future laboratory work
  • Reflection is directed but may not provide useable changes
  • Written in paragraph form as a reflection
  • Conclusion is evidence-based citing the data, refers back to purpose/question/problem and indicates acceptance or rejection of the hypothesis
  • Defines the outcome of the investigation
  • Possible sources of experimental error stated
  • Note any issues of experimental precision and accuracies, including any consistencies or inconsistencies with results.
  • Note any mathematical relationships between independent and dependent variables (or any significant interpolations or extrapolations)
  • Discussion includes new questions, ways to revise/improve the experiment or what could be explored further.

 

Other:

These are specific formatting and construction norms or expectations for all laboratory write-ups

  • May be missing name and due date
  • Report is messy and/or hard to read and lacks consistent organization
  • There are seven or more grammar, usage and mechanical errors
  •  Uses personal pronouns in report rather than passive or polite command voice
  • Includes name but may be missing due date
  • Report is generally neat, readable and presentable but there may have several areas that are messy or unreadable
  • There are less than seven grammar, usage and mechanical errors
  • Uses passive voice or polite commands for most if not all prose
  • Includes name and due date
  • Report is neat, readable and presentable
  • All sections are titled and have a consistent format or organization
  • No more than three grammar, usage and mechanical errors
  • Uses passive voice (no personal pronouns) or polite command voice through-out report

 

May 2010

 

 

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